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On The Bricks Archives

September 5, 2018

Guymon Fiesta happens on Sun., Sept. 16, on Fifth and Main starting at 3 pm and ending at 8 pm.

For those who love good food, the vendors at Fiesta offer a delicious variety of foods.

For those who love having something they can enjoy their whole family, the Fiesta has free jumpy houses for the kids and many of the business tables offer free activities for the kids.

For those who want to celebrate education, the scholarships given to the King and Queen candidates is something to cheer about and enjoy.

For those who love celebrating the history of the Panhandle, remember the Panhandle traces its origins as being part of the Spanish New Spain empire. The Transcontinental Treaty (Adams-Onís Treaty) of 1819 between Spain and the United States set the western boundary of this portion of the Louisiana Purchase at the 100th meridian. With Mexican independence in 1821, these lands became part of Mexico. With the formation of the Texas Republic, they became part of Texas. When Texas joined the U.S. in 1846, the strip became part of the United States.

For those who love the Santa Fe Trail tie, remember the Cimarron Cutoff for the Santa Fe Trail passed through the area soon after the trade route was established in 1826 between the Spanish in Santa Fe and the Americans in St. Louis. The route was increasingly used during the California Gold Rush. The Cutoff passed several miles north of what is now Boise City and Clayton, NM before continuing toward Santa Fe.

When Texas sought to enter the Union in 1845 as a slave state, federal law in the United States, based on the Missouri Compromise, prohibited slavery north of 36°30′ parallel north. Under the Compromise of 1850, Texas surrendered its lands north of 36°30′ latitude. The 170-mile strip of land, a “neutral strip”, was left with no state or territorial ownership from 1850 until 1890. It was officially called the “Public Land Strip” and was commonly referred to as “No Man’s Land.”

The Compromise of 1850 also established the eastern boundary of New Mexico Territory at the 103rd meridian, thus setting the western boundary of the strip. The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 set the southern border of Kansas Territory as the 37th parallel. This became the northern boundary of No Man’s Land. When Kansas joined the Union in 1861, the western part of Kansas Territory was assigned to Colorado Territory, but did not change the boundary.

Whew, that was quite a history lesson that I stole from Wikipedia. But it is interesting. And it does show that celebrating with a Fiesta is really appropriate for Guymon. And because it is part of all our heritage, it is only right that Fiesta is for everybody to enjoy, so come on out and bring your family. It’s mainly a time for people to have fun and be happy to be a part of today’s Oklahoma Panhandle community.

And if that isn’t really your cup of tea, there are lots of other things happening in Guymon this month. It’s busy and it’s a time to meet and visit with others. Come and join the fun.

See you on the bricks!