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Keeping Clean Grant

Main Street Guymon has chosen to support their member retail businesses during the difficult time of COVID-19 with a Keeping Clean Grant.

Each business has had added costs in purchasing the disinfectant wipes and other cleaning supplies that they are using to keep their business safe. These costs can add up quickly, especially when traffic in the stores has decreased as much as 75% in some stores (as reported nationwide to Main Street America).

The first 20 businesses that turn in the simple application and receipts from SPC Office Products for cleaning supplies, will receive a reimbursement from Main Street Guymon for up to $100.

“This is an opportunity for the Main Street Board and Director to support those who have been supporting us and our programs,” says Main Street Business Development Committee Chairman Soila Medina. “We only wish we had more to help.”

The primary reason for the grant is to help the businesses financially, but it is also hoping some of our local businesses realize that purchasing from SPC is a good financial choice for them and supportive of our community. When we buy local, the sales tax dollars go into our local community that takes care of our streets, the ones we drive on, and the water system that sends water through our facet and flushes our toilets and takes care of our parks, city pool, and golf course. It is also part of the funding that has the fairgrounds, Girl Scout Hut, American Legion, Panhandle Services for Children office, Senior Citizen’s, and more leases of properties that they use, many of the leases being $1 a year.

“It’s just smart for us to be taking care of each other in any way we can,” adds Medina. “When our local retail businesses are healthy, it helps the entire community to be healthier.”

The grant is open to all Main Street Guymon retail business members and will stay open until the $2,000 has been expended. Each business member is limited to one grant. If you have questions about the program, email Director@MainStreetGuymon.com.

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On The Bricks

September 9, 2020

Oklahoma has a rich history in aviation.

Thomas and Paul Braniff, founders of Braniff International Airways, were both born in Kansas, Tom in Salina on Dec. 6, 1883, and Paul in Kansas City on Aug. 30, 1897. In 1900, the family moved to the new Oklahoma Territory. In 1928, they began to operate schedule air carrier flights between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Both brother, pioneers in the aviation industry, died in 1954.

James “Jabby” Jabara was the first American jet ace. Born in Muskogee, Okla., on Oct. 10, 1923, he lived in Kansas where he enlisted as an aviation cadet at Fort Riley after graduating from high school. Jabara flew two tours of combat duty in Europe during World War II as a North American P-51 Mustang pilot, and scored 1.5 air victories against German aircraft.

Jabara flew his first jet aircraft in 1948, the USAF Lockheed F-80 Shooting Star before transitioning to the USAF North American F-86 Sabre. Jabara used this aircraft to shoot down multiple Soviet-built MiG-15 jets during the Korean War. He achieved his first confirmed air victory of the war on Apr. 3, 1951. A month later he was credited with his fifth and sixth victories, making him the first American jet ace in history. He eventually scored 15 victories, giving him the title of “triple ace”. Jabara was ranked as the second – highest-scoring U.S. ace of the Korean War. He received the Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, and the British Distinguished Flying Cross for his accomplishments in combat.

He flew the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter and later the Convair B-58 Hustler. In Nov. of 1966, while on leave from service in Vietnam, Colonel Jabara was traveling with his family to their new home when his daughter crashed the car she was driving, killing them both.

Wiley Post, 1898-1935, was the first pilot to fly solo around the world. He was born in Texas on Nov. 22, 1898, but his family moved to Oklahoma when he was five. He was an indifferent student who completed the sixth grade. By 1920, his family settled on a farm near Maysville, Okla.

Young Wiley’s first view of an aircraft in flight came in 1913 at the county fair in Lawton, Okla. The plane was a Curtiss – Wright “Pusher type“. He immediately enrolled in the Sweeney Automobile and Aviation School in Kansas City.

Post’s aviation career began at age 26 as a parachutist for a flying circus, Burrell Tibbs and His Texas Topnotch Fliers, and he became well known on the barnstorming circuit. On Oct. 1, 1926, an oil field accident cost him his left eye, and he used the settlement money to buy his first aircraft. Around this time, he met fellow Oklahoman Will Rogers when he flew Rogers to a rodeo, and the two became close friends. Post was the personal pilot of wealthy Oklahoma oilmen Powell Briscoe and F.C. Hall in 1930 when Hall bought a Lockheed Vega, one of the most famous record-breaking aircraft of the early 1930s. The oilman nicknamed it the Winnie Mae after his daughter, and Post achieved his first national prominence in it by winning the National Air Race Derby, from Los Angeles to Chicago. The fuselage was inscribed, “Los Angeles to Chicago 9 hrs. 8 min. 2 sec. August 27, 1930.”

On June 23, 1931, Post and the Australian navigator Harold Gatty, left Roosevelt Field on Long Island, New York, in the Winnie Mae with a flight plan that took them around the world. They arrived back on July 1, after traveling 15,474 miles in the record time of 8 days, 15 hours, and 51 minutes, in the first successful aerial circumnavigation by a single – engine monoplane.

The reception they received rivaled Charles Lindbergh‘s everywhere they went. They had lunch at the White House on July 6, rode in a ticker-tape parade the next day in New York City. After the flight, Post acquired the Winnie Mae from F.C. Hall, and he and Gatty published an account of their journey titled, Around the World in Eight Days, with an introduction by Will Rogers.

Post decided to attempt a solo flight around the world and to break his previous speed record. After improving his plane, in 1933, he repeated his flight around the world, this time using an auto – pilot and compass in place of his navigator and becoming the first to accomplish the feat alone. Fifty thousand people greeted him on his return on July 22 after 7 days, 18 hours, 49 minutes.

Post helped develop one of the first pressure suits and discovered the jet stream.

On Aug. 15, 1935, Post and American humorist Will Rogers were killed when Post’s aircraft crashed on takeoff from a lagoon near Point Barrow in the Territory of Alaska. Post is buried in Oklahoma City.

Major General Clarence Leonard Tinker was a career United States Army officer, the highest ranking Native – American officer and the first to reach that rank. He was born Nov. 21, 1887, near Pawhuska, Okla., in the Osage Nation. He was raised as an Osage and learned the language and culture from his parents and extended family.

In the fall of 1906, Tinker enrolled at Wentworth Military Academy in Missouri. He graduated in 1908 and was commissioned a third lieutenant in the Philippine Constabulary, serving until 1912.

Tinker began flying lessons. In 1922, he transferred to the Army Air Service.

Tinker commanded various pursuit and bomber units during the 1930s. He was steadily promoted, and on Oct. 1, 1940 became a brigadier general.

After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Tinker was named Commander of the Seventh Air Force in Hawaii to reorganize the air defenses of the islands. He was promoted to major general, the first Native American in U.S. Army history to attain that rank.

In June 1942, in the midst of the Battle of Midway, General Tinker decided to lead a force of early model B-24s against the retreating Japanese navy. Near Midway Island, his plane was seen to go out of control and plunge into the sea. General Tinker and ten other crewmen perished. He was the first U.S. Army general officer to be killed in World War II. Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City is named in his honor.

Some aviation tidbits about Guymon. The airport, where it is today, required a bridge across the draw there at what is today’s Thompson park and an earthen dam was the choice the city fathers chose. That dam sometimes held water and city residents enjoyed the lake … so our fabulous Thompson Park and Sunset Lake was really a sort of happenchance because of the airport.

There are many photos of the Flying Farmers that used to have a club at the Guymon Airport. They would have breakfasts and such and invite other clubs to come in. Looks like they had a good time!

Guymon has an excellent airport and if you haven’t seen it, go out there sometime. It’s great and Gregg Downing is interesting to talk to about planes and such.

Categories
On The Bricks

September 8, 2020

The weather recently has been a shocker. It was hot. Really hot. And then it got cold. And rainy. I love it, but I can’t believe how much it has rained and how the temperature has changed. But that’s nothing …

While a 100 – degree change in temperature in the same day is extremely rare, it has happened at least twice since meteorologists started keeping records. And both times it happened in Montana.

When the weather turns on a dime, it is usually because of a collision of weather fronts, the boundaries between huge masses of air with different densities, temperatures, and humidity levels. Montana seems to be ground zero in an on – going weather front war.

The biggest 24 – hour temperature swing on record occurred in Loman, Mont., on Jan. 14 and 15, 1972. The thermometer climbed from -54 degrees up to 49 degrees, a change of 103 degrees. This barely beat the previous record, set 190 miles away in Browning, Mont., on Jan. 23, 1916, when the temperature went from 44 degrees down to -56 degrees.

Montana owns the 12 – hour records, too. Temperatures in Fairfield, Mont., dropped 84 degrees between noon and midnight on Dec. 14, 1924. And on Jan. 11, 1980, the temperature in Great Falls, Mont., jumped 47 degrees in just seven minutes.

This happens because of chinook winds – warm, dry air masses caused by high mountain ranges. Chinooks form when moist, warm air from the Pacific Ocean encounter the Rocky Mountains along Montana’s western border. As an air mass climbs the western slopes of the mountain range, its moisture condenses rapidly, creating rain and snow.

The rapid condensation sets the stage for the chinook effect by warming the rising air mass. Then, as the air mass descends the other side of the mountain range, the higher air pressure at the lower altitude compresses it, making it even warmer. The result is an extreme warm front that can rise temperatures drastically in a short period of time.

Famous Okie information: The nation’s first “Yield” traffic sign was erected in Tulsa.

Just FYI: Mount Baker in Washington State is the world record holder for the most snowfall in one season. In the winter of 1998 – 99 the ski resort recorded 1,140 inches of snow.

More FYI: Plateau Station, Antarctica, a scientific station that operated from 1965 to 1969, is on average the coldest place on Earth. The average annual temperature there is -70 degrees F.

Keep going on New Years resolutions: Take some of your paychecks and put in savings or invest. Even a small amount can add up. Plan for the future. Be smart with your money.

Made me laugh: The first time I see a jogger smiling, I’ll consider it. ~Joan Rivers

See you on the bricks, soon! Stay safe.

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On The Bricks

August 28, 2020

          Red is the color of fire and blood, so it is associated with energy, war, danger, strength, power, determination as well as passion, desire, and love. It is an emotionally intense color. It enhances human metabolism, increases respiration rate, and raises blood pressure.

The bright red capes of bullfighters (matadors, not rodeo bullfighters) that are used to incite the bovine opponents into spectacular rages is a topic addressed in The Book of Bizarre Truths. The phrase “seeing red” is believed to have originate from the fury the color seems to provoke in the bull.

          The truth is that Bulls are partially color – blind and don’t respond to the color red at all. The red color of the cape is just eye candy for the audience, much like the bullfighter’s suit.

          There is nothing the matador does that makes the bull angry. It is in ill humor before it enters the ring. The bulls aren’t bred to take quiet walks in the park on Sunday afternoons. They are selected because they exhibit violent and aggressive behavior. By the time they hit the bull – fighting arena, just about anything sets them off.

          These bulls have personalities like John McEnroe. The color red doesn’t make them angry – everything makes them angry.

          Famous Okie information: Okmulgee owns the world record for largest pecan pie, pecan cookie, pecan brownie, and biggest ice cream and cookie party. Each June, Okmulgee hosts the annual Pecan Festival.

Keep Going on Your New Years Resolutions: Don’t buy things you don’t need.

Made me laugh: A friend said he told his wife she was drawing her eyebrows too high. She looked surprised.

Aug. 31 the Main Street Cash Mob is hitting the Golden Crown. The mobsters, who are all volunteers that promise to spend a minimum of $20 at each monthly mob, will be able to go to Golden Crown and view online and can even get curbside service if they are COVID weary. The group is so happy to get back to their retail therapy! Anyone who wishes can be a part of the Main Street Cash Mob. Just contact Melyn Johnson, Director@MainStreetGuymon.com, if you would like to be a part of this fun group.

On Sept. 14 a circus is coming to Guymon. And on Sept. 18 is the Guymon High School homecoming.

          See you on the bricks soon!

Categories
On The Bricks

August 27, 2020

          Carter’s Country Supercenter in Guymon is opening on Sept. 3. And they’ll have plenty of shopping carts for their shoppers. Here’s an interesting story about the shopping cart.

An Oklahoma entrepreneur used a simple folding chair to change the way the world shopped. In the late 1930s, Sylvan Goldman was trying to find a way to increase sales. At his two grocery store chains in the Oklahoma City area, Standard and Humpty Dumpty, he noticed when the wire hand baskets became heavy, most customers headed for the checkout.

          Goldman imagined this problem could be remedied if shoppers had a way to conveniently carry more items through the aisles. Puzzling over the problem in his office one evening, he was struck by inspiration when a simple wooden folding chair caught his eye. What if that chair had wheels on the bottom and a basket attached to the seat? Or two baskets?

          The grocer explained his idea to Fred Young, a carpenter and handyman who worked at the store, and Young began tinkering. After many months and many prototypes, they hit on a design they thought might work. Goldman’s first carts used metal frames that held two enormous baskets 19 inches long, 13 inches wide, and 9 inches deep. When not in use, the baskets could be removed and stacked, and the frames folded up to a depth of only five inches, preserving retail floor space.

          His customers were reluctant to use the new contraptions at first. He then hired models of various ages to shop with his “folding carrier baskets.” Eventually they caught on. In 1937, Goldman founded the Folding Carrier Basket Company to manufacture his carts for other stores. They became so popular that by 1940 he was faced with a seven – year backlog of new orders.

Famous Okie information: Chad Richison founded Paycom in 1998. It is one of the first companies to process payroll completely online and has been recognized by FortuneForbes and Inc. Magazine for its continued growth as one of the fastest growing companies in the U.S. A native Oklahoman, Richison was born in Tuttle, graduated from Tuttle High School, and holds a B.A. in Mass Communications from the University of Central Oklahoma. Richison lives with his family in Edmond, Okla., and is deeply involved in his community.

Keep going on New Years resolutions: Let go of grudges and leave hate behind.

Made me laugh: “Never miss a good chance to shut up.” ~Will Rogers

Aug. 31 the Main Street Cash Mob is hitting the Golden Crown. The mobsters, who are all volunteers that promise to spend a minimum of $20 at each monthly mob, will be able to go to Golden Crown and view online and can even get curbside service if they are COVID weary. The group is so happy to get back to their retail therapy! Anyone who wishes can be a part of the Main Street Cash Mob. Just contact Melyn Johnson, Director@MainStreetGuymon.com, if you would like to be a part of this fun group.

On Sept. 14 a circus is coming to Guymon. And on Sept. 18 is the Guymon High School homecoming.

Go by and visit Carter’s at 1902 N. Academy in Guymon.

See you on the bricks, soon! Stay safe.

Categories
On The Bricks

August 22, 2020

          Olivia Joules is the character is a set of novels about a freelance journalist with an overactive imagination, written by Helen Fielding. Olivia Joules teaches you these Rules for Living:

* Never panic. Stop, breathe, think.

* No one is thinking about you. They’re thinking about themselves, just like you.

* Never change your haircut or color before an important event.

* Nothing is either as bad or good as it seems.

* Do as you would be done by, e.g thou shalt not kill.

* It is better to buy one expensive thing that you really like than several cheap ones that you only quite like.

* Hardly anything matters. If you get upset, ask yourself, “Does it really matter?”

* The key to success lies in how you pick yourself up from failure.

* Be honest and kind.

* Only buy clothes that make you feel like doing a small dance.

* Trust your instincts, not your overactive imagination.

* Don’t expect the world to be safe or life to be fair.

          Famous Okie information: Basketball coach Bertha Frank Teague from Byng was the first woman in the National Basketball Hall of Fame.

Keep going on your New Years resolutions: Reduce your waste. Some research says the average American produces over 2,000 pounds of trash every year. Reduce your waste by ditching paper towels in favor of rags you cut up from old towels and clothes. Another easy switch is to use reusable grocery bags. It makes a difference!

Made me laugh: Parallel lines have so much in common. Too bad they will never meet.

Hope you had a great time at Pioneer Days. Thank you to the many volunteers and sponsors that made it happen.

          See you on the bricks soon!

Categories
On The Bricks

August 17, 2021

Oklahoma has a rich and long western tradition. We are celebrating that tradition this week with Pioneer Days, with four rodeo performances for our enjoyment. A great time to be in Guymon! Here’s a little more Oklahoma western tradition.

Jesse Chisholm was born around 1805 to Ignatius Chisholm, of Scottish descent, and Martha (née Rogers), a Cherokee. Jesse moved with his mother to Indian Territory during the early period when some Cherokee migrated there voluntarily from the Southeast, and he grew up in the Cherokee culture.

In 1830, Chisholm helped blaze a trail from Fort Gibson to Fort Towson in Indian Territory. Six years later, Chisholm married Eliza Edwards and they resided in the area of her father’s trading post on the Little River near its confluence with the Canadian River in Indian Territory.

Fluent in several languages, Chisholm served as an interpreter and general aid in several treaties. This diplomatic work spanned 20 years, between 1838 and 1858. During this period, he also continued in the Indian trade, trading manufactured goods for peltry and for cattle.

During the Civil War, Chisholm led a band of refugees to the western part of the territory. At the end of the war, he settled permanently near present-day Wichita, Kansas, and began to trade again into Indian Territory. He built up what had been a military and Indian trail into a road capable of carrying heavy wagons for his goods. This road later became known as Chisholm’s Trail. When the Texas to Kansas cattle drives started, the users of the trail renamed it the Chisholm Trail.

Chisholm died on Mar. 4, 1868, at his last camp near Left Hand Spring (now near Geary, Okla.), due to food poisoning. He is buried there.

Made me laugh: If you wear cowboy clothes are you ranch dressing?

Good advice: Don’t ever take a fence down until you know why it was put up. ~Robert Frost

Pioneer Day Rodeo is Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 pm, and Saturday and Sunday at 2 pm. The Parade is Saturday at 10 am. The Family Fun Time at the Fairgrounds is Saturday from 10 am to 7 pm (with a Food Court). The mercantile is Saturday and Sunday at the Activity Center.

We will have the Farmers Market going on Saturday. It is a great time to get a fried pie or some blueberry bread for breakfast. You can also get some lip balm if you forgot yours! Pick up your fresh melon for lunch, too. We would love to see you before and after the parade.

Catch you on the bricks!

Categories
On The Bricks

August 13, 2020

          William Pickett was one of the first great rodeo cowboys and is credited introducing the sport of bulldogging. He was born on Dec. 5, 1870, in Travis County, Texas, the second of 13 children born to Thomas Jefferson Pickett, a former slave, and Mary “Janie” Gilbert. Pickett was of black and Cherokee descent.

          He and his brothers learned to ride and rope as young boys. By the time he was 18, he and his brothers began breaking horses and a cowboy service called Pickett Brothers Bronco Busters and Rough Riders Association in Taylor, Texas. Credited with inventing bulldogging, the skill of wrestling a running steer to the ground, Pickett began to supplement his income by demonstrating his bulldogging skills and other stunts at county fairs. Legend has it that Pickett resorted to biting the lip of a difficult steer to wrestle it to the dirt.

At age 20, Pickett married Maggie Turner, a former slave and daughter of a white plantation owner. The couple eventually had nine children.

          In 1907, with these skills, he was hired as a cowhand on the 101 Ranch in Oklahoma and participated in the Miller Brothers’ 101 Ranch Wild West Show that featured notable western characters such as Buffalo Bill Cody, Will Rogers, Tom Mix, and others. Pickett moved his family to Oklahoma.

          The show toured around the world. During these times he was sometimes banned from shows because of his color and was forced to claim to be a full – blooded Indian in order to perform. Pickett performed in the show until about 1916.

He later appeared in the silent films The Bull-Dogger (1921) and The Crimson Skull (1922). Pickett continued to work on the ranch until he was kicked in the head while breaking a colt at the 101 Ranch. A few days later he died of his injuries on Apr. 2, 1932, and was buried on the ranch, north of Marland, Okla., near Ponca City.

He was honored by the U.S. Postal Service, who featured Pickett on a stamp as part of its Legends of the West series.

          Today the cowboy skill of bulldogging is still popular on the rodeo circuit. The PRCA, professional rodeo cowboy association, describes bulldogging as “speed and strength are the name of the game in steer wrestling. In fact, with a world record sitting at 2.4 seconds, steer wrestling is the quickest event in rodeo.

The objective of the steer wrestler, who is also known as a ‘bulldogger,’ is to use strength and technique to wrestle a steer to the ground as quickly as possible.

“The steer generally weighs more than twice as much as the cowboy and, at the time the two come together, they’re both often traveling at 30 miles per hour. Speed and precision, the two most important ingredients in steer wrestling, make bulldogging one of rodeo’s most challenging events.

“As with tie-down and team ropers, the bulldogger starts on horseback in a box. The steer gets a head start that is determined by the size of the arena. When the steer reaches the advantage point, the bulldogger takes off in pursuit.

“A perfect combination of strength, timing and technique are necessary for success in the lightning – quick event of steer wrestling. In addition to strength, two other skills critical to success in steer wrestling are timing and balance.

“When the cowboy reaches the steer, he slides down and off the right side of his galloping horse, hooks his right arm around the steer’s right horn, grasps the left horn with his left hand and, using strength and leverage, slows the animal and wrestles it to the ground. His work isn’t complete until the steer is on its side with all four feet pointing the same direction.

Checotah, Okla., calls itself the Steer Wrestling Capitol of the World for the many world class bulldoggers that call this eastern Oklahoma town home.

Be sure to attend the Pioneer Day Rodeo in Guymon this month where you can watch the sport of bull dogging, or steer wrestling, firsthand. The rodeo will be at Guymon’s Hitch Arena on Sunset Drive, Aug. 21 – 23. The performance are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 pm, Saturday and Sunday at 2 pm. The bull riding is the last event at each rodeo performance. Get your tickets early at an outlet for the cheapest price.

Categories
On The Bricks

August 8, 2020…rodeo

Oklahoma is known for rodeo. Many a ranch has been the training ground for a rodeo champion in our state. But, not only the champion riders, but also, the champion stock. Let’s talk about some champion bulls.

In rodeo, points are split, 50/50, between rider and bull. The bull’s tenacity, spirit and elegance are judged each ride, just as the rider’s skills are assessed. A crop of amazing bull riders passed through the sport over the years, so too have there been an equally impressive list of animals that rank at the top.

Bulls are just as much athletes as cowboys, and the great ones are respected, feared and admired. There are a few legendary bulls in the history of bull riding that will go down in history — some mean as blazes, others athletes who gave 110 percent. From the budding days of the sport to the now-popular Pro Bull Riding (PBR) series, these are some the bulls that have made watching rodeo thrilling whose history is tied to Oklahoma.

Tornado is one of the first truly legendary bulls in rodeo. In six years and 220 outs Tornado threw every single rider who attempted to last eight seconds. In many cases, riders who drew his name opted out. He was not nasty or ill tempered. In fact, his owner Jim Shoulders reportedly said he was incredibly docile out of the arena, grazing in the field. The 1,600-pound bull’s strengths were his muscularity, agility, and ability to spin quickly and change direction at the drop of a hat. When Tornado was finally ridden in 1968 by the late, great Warren Granger “Freckles” Brown, the rafters shook.

          Tornado’s owner, Jim Shoulders, who was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, was known as the ‘Babe Ruth of rodeo’. He was born May 13, 1928, in Tulsa, Okla., and died in Henryetta, Okla., on June 20, 2007.

Freckles Brown, who finally rode Tornado, is another Oklahoma cowboy. He was a friend and mentor to bull riding champion Lane Frost, who is buried next to him in Mount Olivet Cemetery in Hugo, Okla.

Oscar, another great bull, was a California bull. At 1,300 pounds he was considerably smaller than most rodeo. In the first five years of his career, Oscar was ridden by 100 cowboys and not one could stay on. While he was small, he could still make trouble for his riders, usually with a fast, violent spin to the left. By the end of his career, Oscar would be ridden eight times in 300 outs, by just a handful of riders.

Red Rock is one of rodeo’s most famous bulls because in the 309 outs during his PRCA career between 1983 and 1987, he was never ridden. Red Rock was unridable, not because he was mean or temperamental, but because he was smart. He could somehow sense a rider’s moves and then pull a swift and effective counterattack. It wasn’t until Red Rock made a brief return from retirement in 1988 that he was ridden. In this one-off “Challenge of the Champions”, 1987’s PRCA World Champion Rider and Oklahoma cowboy Lane Frost was pitted against Red Rock (himself voted Bucking Bull of the Year in 1987) for seven rides. Frost managed to ride Red Rock not just once, but four times out of seven.

Few bulls were as feared as Bodacious. The 1,900-pound bull was such a nasty son of a gun that he terrified even the most seasoned of rodeo’s riders. Bodacious would explode out of the chute at an impressive speed and, more sinisterly, would throw back his head using his skull and horns as weapons. In 135 outs, Bodacious bucked off 127 riders.

Bodacious, the world’s most dangerous bull, was born in 1988 on the Merrick Ranch in the Arbuckle Mountains of Oklahoma.

Bodacious had grown into his full adult weight of 1,900 pounds. “Bo was psychotic. He didn’t like people,” said bull riding champion Cody Lambert. “If you were on his back, he wanted to hurt you.”

An article in the New Yorker described the encounter, “… a split second after leaving the chute, the bull bucked forward with all his might. (Tuff) Hedeman did what riders are supposed to do: he leaned high over the bull’s shoulders and flung his arm back as a counterbalance. But just as he came forward, Bodacious threw his head back – smashing it square into Hedeman’s face. Hedeman stayed on somehow, his hand twisted in the rope, only to get head-butted again, thrown into the air, and bounced off the bull’s back like a rag doll.”

Hedeman lasted four seconds. ” When I hit the ground,” said the bull rider. “I felt numb.” What Hedeman could not see was how his face really looked; how much blood was on it. “When I was walking out of the arena I bit down and my teeth didn’t come together, so I figured my jaw was broken,” Hedeman recalled. “I didn’t realize my whole face was smashed. But when I looked at people looking at me, they looked like they’d seen the devil.” At the hospital, doctors diagnosed Hedeman and said every major bone in his face was broken. Hedeman went through two surgeries which installed six titanium plates and totaled 13 hours. On discharge, the swelling of his face was so extreme that his own young son could not recognize him. He called Bodacious, “the baddest bull there has ever been.”

Then, in the 9th round of the NFR two nights later, bull rider Scott Breding drew Bodacious. Breding gave Bodacious his final professional ride. It took less than four seconds for Bodacious to use the same move that he did on Hedeman to fracture Scott’s left eye socket and cheekbone. He also broke his nose and knocked him unconscious.

In round 10 of the next day, Dec. 11, 1995, the gate opened to reveal Sammy Andrews and then a yellow bull flashed out of a chute without a rider. Andrews announced that his famous bull was officially retired. The crowd was both shocked and relieved. Bodacious was seven years old at the time, still in his prime. 

“I didn’t want to be the guy who let him kill someone,” Andrews said. Andrews said Bodacious would be used for breeding.

Bodacious spent his retirement on the Andrews Rodeo Company Ranch. When the breeding organization, Buckers, Inc., was formed, Bodacious was its first client. 

Be sure to come out to the Pioneer Day Rodeo at Guymon’s Hitch Arena on Sunset, Aug. 21 – 23. The performance are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 pm, Saturday and Sunday at 2 pm. The bull riding is the last event at each rodeo performance.

Categories
On The Bricks

August 5, 2020

          Last Saturday morning at the Farmers Market, I met two young watercolor artists from Guymon. They were delightful ladies and so very talented. Leyla Meza had a table and sold some notecards with her work and other items. I bought some of the notecards because Leyla’s art made me smile.

          When I got home, I already had thought about several cousins of mine who would love the art on the cards, too, and I sat down and wrote them a little chatty note. I love my cousins. They live a long ways away. I don’t get to see them often enough. It was a good thing to sit and write them. After five notes, I was feeling really happy.

          I had been to a little cousins get together and didn’t even leave my house.

          Thank you to Leyla for giving me the opportunity to share the happiness you bring through your art.

          You might go to the market and meet her yourself. She is a bit shy and quiet. You’ll like her.

          And I made a deal with the baker, Sue Smith, who has some of the best sweet bread, wheat bread, and pies you ever had at the market. She sold all she could at the Guymon and Liberal Farmers Market and then she posted on facebook if anyone wanted to come and pick something that was left up. What was left, Main Street Guymon took and shared with some of our favorite Main Street members and volunteers.

          Pies went to Bank of the Panhandle employees. Pies went to the Workforce Oklahoma employees. And sweet breads went to the various City of Guymon departments. It is the Parks Department, the Street Department, and the Sanitation Department that helps Main Street volunteers in so many ways. What better way to show our appreciate than to support one of our Farmer’s Market vendors at the same time? I felt like Santa Clause. I pretty much have the right shape, but the beard isn’t going to happen.

          It’s a good day to be from the Oklahoma Panhandle!

          Pioneer Days Rescheduled is going to be August 21 and 23. One of my Main Street volunteers and I went out and hung up posters. Well, I drove him and he went and did the hanging. I think we’ll have more to do tomorrow. The Chamber has a full Schedule of Events out on their website and Facebook page and there are some left at businesses around town.

          See you on the bricks!